Share. Africa’s black crake (Limnocorax flavirostra) is a 20-centimetre- (8-inch-) long form, black with a green bill… Click here for more information about the Red List categories and criteria Justification of Red List category Data from ongoing (albeit modest) monitoring in Russia (which holds the vast majority of the global population) indicate that the predicted declines have not taken place and that numbers have remained stable since 2002 or are even increasing. There is an ongoing reintroduction programme in England, UK (Newbery (2006). A NEW PLAN is being developed to save the corncrake from extinction. Corncrake numbers drop to just 183 males in Ireland as bird disappears from former stronghold Since 2012, the State has spent over €2.4m in various initiatives to save the corncrake. Facts. The Isle of Iona is one of the best places in Scotland to see corncrakes as the hay and silage fields and also iris beds supply lots of cover for this rare and elusive bird which unfortunately is in decline. Although corncrake chicks cannot fly until they’re 35 days old, the female often abandons them to fend for themselves at 12 days old, so she can start another nest. If it appears incomplete or if you wish to see article references, visit the rest of its contents here. Other articles where Corncrake is discussed: crake: The corncrake, or land rail (Crex crex), of Europe and Asia, migrating south to Africa, is a slightly larger brown bird with a rather stout bill and wings showing reddish in flight. The corncrake or landrail is one of Britain’s most endangered birds. Their repetitive call sounds like two sticks being rubbed together. The plumage is mostly buffy with blackish brown streaking on the back; the face is grey with a buff streak through the eye. The corncrake is a typical rail, with a large body and strong legs. Corncrake is a misnomer–these birds rarely nest in cornfields. A European action plan was published in 1996 and a revised version published in 2006 (Koffijberg and Schaffer 2006), and a Corncrake Conservation Team was established in 1998. Read More. The corncrake, or land rail (Crex crex), of Europe and Asia, migrating south to Africa, is a slightly larger brown bird with a rather stout bill and wings showing reddish in flight.Africa’s black crake (Limnocorax flavirostra) is a 20-centimetre- (8-inch-) long form, black with a green bill and pink legs.It is less secretive than most. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Corncrake ecology, legal status and population trends Corncrakes (Crex crex) are members of the Rallidae family, associated with a variety of marshy and dry grassland habitats (Cramp & Simmons 1980, Schaffer 1997, Green et al. They prefer hay fields, but changes in farming practices resulted in a drastic decline in the 20th century. Corncrake Project Annual Report 2018 5 1. Creature Profile. This article is only an excerpt. Facts Summary: The Corncrake (Crex crex) is a species of concern belonging in the species group "birds" and found in the following area(s): Africa to Asia. 1997). The corn crake, corncrake or landrail (Crex crex) is a bird in the rail family.It breeds in Europe and Asia as far east as western China, and migrates to Africa for the Northern Hemisphere's winter.It is a medium-sized crake with buff- or grey-streaked brownish-black upperparts, chestnut markings on the wings, and blue-grey underparts with rust-coloured and white bars on the flanks and undertail.