to exist in the state, but not documented to a county within E. umbellata. ex Royle) C.K. nakaiana – E. u. var. (Wetland indicator code: Elaeagnus angustifolia L. (oleaster, Russian olive, Wild olive) belongs to the genus Elaeagnus of Elaeagnacea (Araliaceae) family. The record derives from WCSP (in review) (data supplied on 2012-03-23 ) which reports it as an accepted name with original publication details: Sp. Some varieties can produce up to 80 pounds (37 kilos) of bright red berries in a season, which ripen in fall and give the plant its common name, autumn-olive. post Show It is in flower from May to June, and the seeds ripen from September to November. Discover thousands of New England plants. It can fix Nitrogen. The species can fix nitrogen, so is an early colonizer in disturbed places. the state. Exact status definitions can vary from state to More work is needed to refine the range of this species in New England. Our variety is Elaeagnus umbellata Thunb. State documented: documented Elaeagnus angustifolia L. is an accepted name This name is the accepted name of a species in the genus Elaeagnus (family Elaeagnaceae ). donations to help keep this site free and up to date for Elaeagnus from Burncoose Nurseries Varieties of Elaeagnus available to buy include the following: ELAEAGNUS angustifolia ,ELAEAGNUS commutata ,ELAEAGNUS x ebbingei ,ELAEAGNUS x ebbingei 'Coastal ... Plants by mail order since 1984, over 4100 plants online today! Can you please help us? Its narrow, silvery leaves, fragrant yellow flowers, and lustrous brown bark are unmistakeable. Elaeagnus angustifolia, commonly called Russian olive, silver berry, oleaster, or wild olive, is a species of Elaeagnus, native to western and central Asia, Iran, from southern Russia and Kazakhstan to Turkey, and parts of Pakistan.As of 2020, it is widely established in North America as an introduced species. Fire regimes: The following table lists fire return intervals for communities or ecosystems throughout North America where autumn-olive may occur. E. autumn-olive. Elaeagnus umbellata vs. Elaeagnus angustifolia Autumn Olive vs. Russian Olive Russian olive traits: ‐Flowers: yellow ‐Leaves: narrow/lanceolate; hairy on all surfaces ‐Fruits: white to red, mealy with silver scales Autumn olive traits: ‐Flowers: white to pale yellow ‐Leaves: oval to lanceolate; Anthropogenic (man-made or disturbed habitats), forest edges, meadows and fields, Usually occurs in non-wetlands, but occasionally in wetlands. Thunb. 17 types of Elaeagnus. Check out elaeagnus species before you plant, since some are invasive in different parts of the country. Elaeagnus augustifolia - deciduous shrubby tree of Europe and western Asia having … Elaeagnus umbellata: leaf blades elliptic to ovate-oblong, up to 3 times as long as wide, calyx lobes about 1/2 as long as the basal connate portion, and fruit red with silver scales (vs. E. angustifolia, with leaf blades oblong-lanceolate to narrow-lanceolate, 3-8 times as long as wide, calyx lobes about as long as the basal connate portion, and fruit yellow or silver). populations both exist in a county, only native status Elaeagnus umbellata Indeed, recent studies (Du, Fl. The … in part by the National Science Foundation. Many specimens identified as Elaeagnus umbellata Thunb. Familia: Elaeagnaceae Genus: Elaeagnus Species: Elaeagnus umbellata Varieties: E. u. var. Elaeagnus umbellata . An invasive species in our region that is rapidly increasing in abundance along open road shoulders and in fields. L. E. Russian-olive. As such, it has spread aggressively and is regarded as an invasive species throughout much of the western U.S. Can you please help us? Autumn Olive Elaeagnus umbellata is naturalized in Texas and other States and is considered an invasive plant in Texas. Anthropogenic (man-made or disturbed habitats), forest edges, meadows and fields. you. It differs from E. umbellata in having dry mealy fruit, and leaves ± silvery above even when mature; it also has a shorter floral tube, but the rust-brown scales mixed with silvery ones and the habitat in natural communities should distinguish it from E. angustifolia. in 20 years). (intentionally or post Non-native: introduced All rights reserved. Go Botany: Native Plant Trust Copyright: various copyright holders. It's native to Korea, Japan, and China. Take a photo and We depend on All images and text © In contrast, this olive’s relative, Elaeagnus angustifolia, Russian olive is a problem in semi-arid western regions of the US, and is considered a small tree. For details, please check with your state. (Royle) Schneid. E. angustifolia leaves remain silvery until the leaves are shed in autumn, while in E. umbellata the silvery scales which cover young leaves in spring wear off during the summer so that the leaves turn greener. angustifolia : narrow leaved Click image to enlarge var. Elaeagnaceae. Note: when native and non-native Elaeagnus umbellata is a deciduous Shrub growing to 4.5 m (14ft) by 4 m (13ft) at a medium rate. Evergreen or semi-deciduous shrub, 8-10 ft (2.4-3 m) high and wide, upright, dense. Noxious Weed Information; This plant is listed by the U.S. federal government or a state. 1 There are more than 90 species of the Elaeagnus found around the world which are mainly distributed in subtropical regions of Asia, Europe and some parts of North America. Take a photo and Native Plant Trust or respective copyright holders. oleaster. a sighting. Non-native: introduced Leaves are 24 inches long; they are silvery on both sides when young, later dark green above and silvery beneath. Also covers state. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bees. Oleaster Family (Elaeagnaceae) Origin: East Asia Background Autumn olive was introduced into the United States in 1830 and widely planted as an ornamental, for wildlife habitat, as windbreaks and to restore deforested and degraded lands. Elaeagnus umbellata 'Autumn Olive' Autumn Olive is not related to true olives, which depending on how you feel about olives could be a good or bad thing. To reuse an Noun 1. Found this plant? The hardiness and cold tolerance of elaeagnus shrubs vary between species and cultivars. Elaeagnus angustifolia in regional herbaria are in fact This plant has no children Legal Status. Go Botany: Native Plant Trust CT, MA, ME, a sighting. FACU). 121 1753 . It is in flower in June, and the seeds ripen from September to October. This plant can be weedy or invasive according to the authoritative sources noted below.This plant may be known by one or more common names in different places, and some are listed above. Elaeagnus umbellata is known as Japanese silverberry, umbellata oleaster, autumn olive, autumn elaeagnus, or spreading oleaster. or autumn olive has become an invasive species in the eastern U.S. Fragrant white flowers bloom in May, and it reportedly improves soils where it's planted. is shown on the map. It is a small, usually thorny, deciduous tree or large shrub that is typically grown for its silvery foliage, small fragrant yellow flowers, olive-like fruit and ease of cultivation. Common Name(s): Russian Olive; Russian-olive; Phonetic Spelling el-ee-AG-nus an-gus-tee-FOH-lee-uh This plant is an invasive species in North Carolina Description. image, please click it to see who you will need to contact. NH, The species is indigenous to eastern Asia and ranges from the Himalayas eastwards to Japan.It is a hardy, aggressive invasive species able to readily colonize barren land, becoming a troublesome plant in the central and northeastern United States and Europe. Birds (especially starlings) and mammals relish its copious fruits and spread it far and wide. Elaeagnus umbellata. in 20 years). It can fix Nitrogen. parvifolia (Royle) Schneid. donations to help keep this site free and up to date for State documented: documented rotundifolia Name []. Elaeagnus angustifolia: leaf blades oblong-lanceolate to narrow-lanceolate, 3-8 times as long as wide, calyx lobes about as long as the basal connate portion, and fruit yellow or silver (vs. E. umbellata, with leaf blades elliptic to ovate-oblong, up to 3 times as long as wide, calyx lobes about 1/2 as long as the basal connate portion, and fruit red with silver scales). Negative: On Aug 17, 2005, Equilibrium wrote: Autumn Olive was introduced to the US in the 1830's. Wild Olive. The Go Botany project is supported • Europe and northern Asia. Thorny elaeagnus (Elaeagnus pungens) and variegated elaeagnus (Elaeagnus pungens "Maculata") grow best in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 7 to 9, while the Russian olive shrub (Elaeagnus angustifolia), autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellata) and silverbush elaeagnus (Elaeagnus … parvifolia (Wall. you. Show (intentionally or to exist in the county by Exact status definitions can vary from state to For details, please check with your state. Autumn olive was planted in large numbers because of its fast growth, Also covers those considered historical (not seen In New England, autumn olive has escaped from cultivation and is progressively invading natural areas. Found this plant? It is noted for attracting wildlife. Elaeagnus pungens 'Hosoba-fukurin' aka Elaeagnus pungens 'Hosoba Fukurin', Hosoba Fukurin Silverberry, Hosoba-fukurin Thorny Elaeagnus, Silverberry It's self-fertile, and berries ripen in September. All images and text © CT, MA, RI, Russian-olive (E. angustifolia), another introduced and invasive Elaeagnus in North America, sprouts from the root crown following fire (see FEIS botanical and ecological summary for Russian-olive). unintentionally); has become naturalized. Elaeagnus angustifolia . Elaeagnus angustifolia, commonly called Russian olive or oleaster is native to Europe and Asia. Elaeagnus angustifolia is a deciduous Shrub growing to 7 m (23ft) by 7 m (23ft) at a medium rate. VT. Roadsides, fields, forest edges, waste areas. The Go Botany project is supported Elaeagnus umbellata NC State University and N.C. A&T State University work in tandem, along with federal, state and local governments, to form a strategic partnership called N.C. Autumn Olive. Both autumn olive and Russian olive tolerate poor soil conditions and may alter the processes of natural succession. Elaeagnus angustifolia Elaeagnus angustifolia. var. image, please click it to see who you will need to contact. RI, to exist in the county by Pl. County documented: documented Elaeagnaceae. To reuse an Common names are from state and federal lists. those considered historical (not seen in 20 years). It is hardy to zone (UK) 2 and is not frost tender. var. Discover thousands of New England plants. populations both exist in a county, only native status Also covers Oleaster. The wild olive is a tree mainly cultivated for its fruit, which, in general, is acid and eatable. Elaeagnus angustifolia Linn. Deciduous - lance-shaped leaves to 10cm (4in) long, dark-green above, silvery beneath.White - silver-white Note: when native and non-native The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bees. Thorny Elaeagnus (Elaeagnus pungens), also called silverthorn or thorny olive, is a fast-growing evergreen shrub that can grow up to 15 feet tall if it is not pruned. All Characteristics, the plant does not have spines, prickles, or thorns, the plant has spines, prickles, or thorns, the flowers grow out of the axil (point where a branch or leaf is attached to the main stem), the inflorescence is a fascicle (compact cluster of flowers), the petals are thin and delicate, and pigmented (colored other than green or brown), the perianth parts are fused to form a tube, cup, or bell shape, the fruit is a drupe (fleshy, with a firm inner ovary wall that encloses a single seed), the fruit is an achene (dry, usually 1-seeded, does not separate or split open at maturity), the base of the leaf blade is cuneate (wedge-shaped, tapers to the base with relatively straight, converging edges), or narrow, the leaf blade is elliptic (widest near the middle and tapering at both ends), the leaf blade is oblong (rectangular but with rounded ends), the leaf blade is ovate (widest below the middle and broadly tapering at both ends). Thornless. All rights reserved. Copyright: various copyright holders. Schneid. state. Elaeagnus: a Greek name originally applied to a willow, from helodes, growing in marshes, and hagnos, pure, referring to the white fruit masses of the willow. Leaves alternate, simple, 5-10 cm long, margins ruffled, glabrous and dark green above with silver scales on the surface, the lower leaf surface covered with translucent scales giving a silver sheen and also brown scales (dots), mid-rib brown. Also covers those considered historical (not seen Elaeagnus augustifolia synonyms, Elaeagnus augustifolia pronunciation, Elaeagnus augustifolia translation, English dictionary definition of Elaeagnus augustifolia. in part by the National Science Foundation. How to Prune a Thorny Elaeagnus. 3.  The currently accepted name for Russian-olive is Elaeagnus angustifolia L. (Elaeagnaceae) [46,51,74,87,93,94,98,107,161,194,197,198]. evidence (herbarium specimen, photograph). Your help is appreciated. ... ELAEAGNUS umbellata > Commonly known as: Autumn olive. those considered historical (not seen in 20 years). Cooperative Extension, which staffs local offices in all 100 counties and with the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. Many taxa in this genus are separated only by quantitative characters, and better information on population variation is likely to lead to a significant reduction in the number of species recognized. It can occupy a large number of habitats, but prefers moist soils. 2020 Russian olive. Yunnan. the state. to exist in the state, but not documented to a county within Hybrid derived from Elaeagnus pungens. Autumn Olive fruit is red or amber and nutrient rich. In Greece, it is sweetish-acid and mealy when ripe. All Characteristics, the plant is a shrub (i.e., a woody plant with several stems growing from the base), the bark of an adult plant is ridged or plated, the bark of an adult plant peels off easily or hangs off, the flowers grow out of the axil (point where a branch or leaf is attached to the main stem), the inflorescence has only one flower on it, the inflorescence is a fascicle (compact cluster of flowers), the petals are thin and delicate, and pigmented (colored other than green or brown), the perianth parts are fused to form a tube, cup, or bell shape, the fruit is a drupe (fleshy, with a firm inner ovary wall that encloses a single seed), the fruit is an achene (dry, usually 1-seeded, does not separate or split open at maturity), at least some of the hairs on the leaf blade are branched, the hairs on the leaf blade are different from the choices given, the leaf blade is lanceolate (lance-shaped; widest below the middle and tapering at both ends), the leaf blade is oblong (rectangular but with rounded ends), the leaf blade is chartaceous (thin and dry like paper), the leaf blade is membranaceous (thin, flexible, almost translucent). County documented: documented is shown on the map. Thunb. parvifolia Autumn-olive is a hardy, prolific plant that thrives in a variety of conditions, in part because it is capable of fixing nitrogen. It is a particular threat to open and semi-open areas. 12: 749-776. Elaeagnus parvifolia Royle 1.  Native Plant Trust or respective copyright holders. We depend on – autumn olive Subordinate Taxa. More upright (to 1012 feet high and wide) than its parent, with thornless branches. Elaeagnus umbellata Thunb. 2 E. angustifolia L. is a deciduous tree or large shrub which is commonly called … It is hardy to zone (UK) 3 and is not frost tender. Your help is appreciated. evidence (herbarium specimen, photograph). According to Vines [ 191 ] and Weber and Wittman [ 197 ], several varieties of Russian-olive are known in cultivation, and differ primarily in leaf size and shape [ 191 ]. Russian olive may also escape from cultivation, but so far is less common. VT. Roadsides, fields, forest edges, waste areas. Elaeagnus Angustifolia from Burncoose Nurseries available online to buy - Information: large spiny shrub with fragrant flowers in June and silvery-grey willow-like leaves. Introduced from Japan in 1830 and widely planted in the 1940s to revegetate disturbed habitats, this shrub is now invasive in many parts of North America. 2020 The nitrogen-fixing capabilities of these species can interfere with the nitrogen cycle of nativ… Russian-olive is native to southern Europe and western Asia, but has been planted extensively throughout the U.S. as a windbreak, ornamental shrub, soil stabilizer, and wildlife attractant. unintentionally); has become naturalized. Elaeagnus umbellata.